Family Dentist Ottawa Ontario - St. Laurent Dental Centre

On behalf of the entire team we would like to extend a warm welcome to our practice website. Everyone at the practice is committed to providing you with the very best in dental healthcare. Our staff each bring a level of commitment and years of experience to the practice and have all attained high standards of professional qualification. Our primary goal is to provide excellence in all facets of dentistry and to carry it out in a gentle and caring way using the latest techniques.

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Conveniently Located : Lower Level next to SportChek, & on the way to OC Transpo Station

Our office hours are:

Monday: 8am - 5pm
Tuesday - Thursday: 8am - 8pm

Friday8am - 4pm

We look forward to meeting you and taking care of your smile.

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Posts Under Oral Health

A question parents frequently ask is “When should my child get braces?”
Often the answer isn’t that simple. 
2 equally qualified orthodontists will likely give you a different answer. To complicate matters more, they may differ on their treatment plans as well. 
So why this disparity? 
And what should you do?
While there is no ‘perfect age’ for braces, there are some factors to help determine when your child is an ideal candidate for them. 

Orthodontic Screening
The first thing you should do is book an evaluation with your orthodontist. Orthodontists specialize in diagnosing and correcting problems with the teeth and face, and will be able to assess whether your child needs braces. 
The American Association of Orthodontists recommends children should be evaluated by the time they’re age 7.  However, some circumstances may require earlier intervention, such as:
    •    Excessive overcrowding of teeth
    •    Open bites: when the upper and lower front teeth fail to meet 
    •    Overbites: when the upper teeth protrude past the lower teeth
    •    Underbites: when the lower teeth protrude past the upper teeth
    •    Crossbites: when the upper and lower jaw fail to line up

Phase 1 & Phase 2 Treatment
The phase 1 treatment (also known as early intervention treatment) starts before all the permanent teeth have grown out (often when the child is 6 to 10 years old). This treatment is usually recommended to make more space for developing teeth and correct oral problems, such as overbites and cross bites. Phase 1 treatment often involves limited dental hardware, such as expanders and partial braces. 
Phase 2 treatment (also known as comprehensive treatment) begins when the child is older (age 11 to 13) and when all their permanent teeth have grown in. This treatment usually involves full braces.
Whether your child will need phase 1 or 2 treatments will depend on the state of their teeth and if the orthodontist feels earlier intervention is required. 

Why early examinations are beneficial
Having your children examined earlier (before age 7) has numerous benefits, including:
    •    Long-term treatment can be properly determined
    •    Oral problems can be identified earlier
    •    Teeth can be more easily guided for braces, reducing the time they have to be worn
Talk to your orthodontist and together you can come up with the best treatment plan for your child. Braces not only help straighten teeth, they also enhance your child’s self confidence by improving their smile. 
At St. Laurent Dental, our orthodontists are qualified and experienced to help you determine when your child is ready for braces. Contact our office today for more information. 


For decades, it’s been the dental credo that fluoride is an essential part of preventing cavities and building stronger teeth. But when it comes to our overall health, its status remains less clear. Water fluoridation remains a heated topic of debate.

While medical establishments urge people to educate themselves about the benefits of fluoride, others are more wary. Some vocal groups argue that even if fluoride has helpful properties, the dangers of it are too risky for a beautiful smile. We’ll take a closer look at the controversy surrounding this substance.

So what is fluoride?

Believe it or not, it’s a naturally occurring mineral that can be found in the food we eat and the water we drink. However, the natural fluoride level for these things can vary greatly, and thus why people are debating whether adding fluoride to drinking water is safe.

There’s solid evidence that shows fluoride is beneficial for your teeth. The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that fluoridated water reduces tooth decay over a person's lifetime by 25 percent. A study in the Journal of Dental Research also supports these claims. The researchers analyzed data from almost 3800 adults who participated in the 2004 to 2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health. Based on their results, they found subjects who lived in communities with fluoridated water had significantly less tooth decay – up to 30 percent less – when compared to subjects who lived in unfluoridated communities.

But that’s not the whole story. While fluoride helps fight tooth decay, ingesting extreme amounts of it can be dangerous. Young children can also develop fluoride toxicity by ingesting large amounts of fluoride. In fact, getting too much fluoride can increase the risk of fluorosis – a condition that stains the teeth.

But don’t be alarmed – you would have to drink 5,000 to 10,000 glasses of fluoridated water in one sitting to reach unsafe levels. Basically any substance can be considered toxic if over consumed. A great example is alcohol. In small quantities, it’s been shown to have health benefits, like reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. But if you’re taking 10 shots of vodka in 30 minutes, you’re going to find its pretty lethal stuff.

Like any substance, it’s the dose that makes the difference. Fluoride in small amounts has been shown to be effective in preventing cavities and tooth decay. People of all ages can benefit their oral health by exposing their gums and teeth to fluoride. Fluoride helps to rebuild your tooth enamel which can be worn-down from acidic bacteria by the foods we eat. Fluoride also makes it more difficult for plaque to stick to your teeth.

The easiest way to get fluoride is by simply drinking water. Health Canada monitors safety levels and has deemed drinking water in Canada among the safest in the world. You can also use fluoridated toothpaste, mouthwash or oral supplements. These few fluoride sources are more than enough to keep your decay at bay.

In the end, you shouldn’t be worried about fluoride. In fact, the fluoridation of drinking water is one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century. So sit back and enjoy that refreshing glass of water. Your teeth will thank you for it.

A toothache is a terrible thing to endure. 

If you’ve been unlucky enough of having one, you know how painful they can be.  

The numbing throbbing pain you can feel in your jaw and just about every other part of your body. 
They also have a knack of hitting you at the worse possible times – when it’s late at night and your dentist’s office is closed. Talk about frustrating!

So why do we get toothaches?

Toothaches happen when the central portion of the tooth, the pulp, becomes inflamed. The pulp contains nerve endings that are highly sensitive to pain. Inflammation to the pulp can be caused by various reasons such as cavities, trauma, and infection. 

It’s important that if your tooth aches you should see a dentist as soon as possible. There’s a chance it could be infected and if left untreated it can lead to bigger health problems beyond the affected tooth.  

These 5 home remedies should hold you over until you can visit the dentist:

Salt water
This is probably one of the best ways for soothing a toothache. Mix ¼ to 1/2 tsp. of salt in a glass of warm water. Gargle it for 5 to 10 seconds, spit it out and repeat. The salt water helps kill the bacteria in the affected area and reduce the pressure on the nerve endings. 

Note: Don’t swallow the salt water.

Aspirin    
Painkillers provide quick, effective relief for minor toothaches. Having a sore tooth can make it difficult to eat, speak and even sleep, so an over-the-counter pain medicine can help ease the pain. 

Note: Don’t place the aspirin on the gum of the affected tooth. Aspirin is an acid and will burn your gums. Swallow the aspirin instead.
 
Clove Oil
Clove oil, also known as Eugenol, is a common ingredient found in dental products. Cloves have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant and anesthetic properties that help ease tooth pain and fight infection. 

Mix 2-3 drops with olive or cooking oil and apply the mixture on the sore tooth. You can also dab a cotton ball in the oil mixture and rub it on the affected area. 

Note: You can find clove oil at most drug stores

Ice Pack
Fill a Ziploc bag with ice, wrap a cloth around it, and hold it over your cheek where it hurts. The cold temperature will numb the pain.  

Note: Don’t apply the ice directly on the affected tooth. Teeth inflamed by toothaches are sensitive to hot and cold temperatures, so this will only increase the pain. 

Hard Liquor
Alcohol is an antiseptic and an astringent and can help ease the pain of a toothache. Swoosh a bit of whiskey, scotch or vodka. Another option is pouring some it on a cotton ball and applying it to the sore tooth. 

Note: A strong mouthwash with alcohol will also work.

You brush and floss.
You take care of your teeth.
But for some reason, your jaw hurts.
In fact, it’s throbbing…
You visit your dentist to see what’s wrong. That’s when you discover your problems are due to a wisdom tooth. Your dentist recommends surgery to remove it. Yikes.
So what should you do?
Read on to get all the facts about wisdom teeth and learn about your options…

While all of your teeth contribute to the appearance of your smile, there are 6 teeth that play the biggest role in creating an attractive smile. Knowing their location and role will help you to understand how the dentists at St. Laurent Dental Centre can help you improve your smile.

Regular checkups with your dentist can do more than keep your teeth healthy – it can keep your body healthy too. There’s a strong correlation between one’s oral health and overall health. The hygiene of your mouth can greatly affect the rest of your body.
Bacteria that accumulates on teeth may make the gums susceptible to infection. In defense, your immune system attacks the infection leading to the gums being inflamed. The inflammation continues until the infection is stabilized. If left untreated, it can erode gums and teeth resulting in gum disease (known as periodontitis) and problems with other body parts.



Gum Disease and Health Issues
Research from the Academy of General Dentistry shows a link between gum disease and other health problems, such as diabetes, digestive problems and heart disease. Women with gum disease are also more likely to give birth to pre-mature or low weight babies.
Other studies reveals that most systemic diseases – diseases affecting the whole body – involve oral complications, such as mouth ulcers, swollen gums, and dry mouth. Systemic diseases include diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, leukemia and oral cancer.
Gum Disease and Diabetes
The gum disease/diabetes relationship may be the strongest one of all. Inflammation originating from the mouth may negatively affect the body’s ability to manage sugar levels. People with diabetes have problems controlling blood sugar levels since their body cells don’t break down sugar the way healthy body cells do. This results in extremely high blood sugar and insulin levels. To make matters more complicated, gum disease and diabetes appear to have a two-way relationship. High blood sugar levels can also promote infections to grow, such as gum infections.
Gum Disease and Heart Disease Researchers at the American Academy of Periodontology found that people with gum disease are two times more likely to suffer from coronary artery disease than those without it. The two diseases have a number of common risk factors, such as being overweight, unhealthy eating habits, and smoking.
If you suffer from gum disease, oral bacteria can make its way to your bloodstream and lead to infection in your heart and lungs. The bacteria can also stick to the insides leading to blockages and blood clots to form. All these factors greatly increase one’s risk of having heart complications, such heart disease, heart attacks and strokes.
Establishing Good Hygiene Habits  
You can minimize potential health complications by:

  • Brushing your teeth for 2-3 minutes after every meal with fluoride toothpaste.
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque and using mouth wash to get rid of bacteria.
  • Eating plenty of healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, to get your nutrients.
  • Avoiding cigarettes and alcohol, which increase one’s risk of developing gum disease and oral cancer.
  • Visiting your dentist annually for cleanings and to check for cavities and gum problems.
 Following these steps can not only protect your teeth, it can also save your life!